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it was the crime was bad. >> at that time baltimore was the number one for killing city in america. to overcome that and rise above that and sit here and talk to you and try to describe that atmosphere to you, i'll be here all day. >> i want to talk a little bit about what i think a lot of people talk about which is your grandfather who's been described as your best friend. you were about to reach the pin cal of your career when he died in the commission of a crime. and i was surprised how it didn't make you turn angry and bitter. that surprised me a lot. most people that would -- never get over that and become hardened people and you haven't done that. why not? >> i was. >> you were a mad person? >> no question about it. i was young, you know, i just committed to go to wake forest, signed my letter of intent, probably the happiest day of my life. spent the night with my grandfather and the next night found out he had been murdered. i was bitter. i talked to my mom about when you're a kid you make rational decision, i don't know if i can hope anymore, my grand dad is at every game. and i questi
slowly in baltimore city than elsewhere. the mayor said in the baltimore sun, quote, we might be annoyed and hot as heck. we can get over that. but if we lose a vulnerable citizen, we can't get over that. end quote. so why not restore power to, let's say, nursing homes first? >> well, it's always a challenge. we have our public safety priorities, and we always go after those first. those are 911s centers and water treatment plants and pumping stations. we spent the better part of the first day to two days doing those tasks. but when you get into aspects of life like nursing homes, beyond that type of public safety, you then start to get into a position of so which is more important? what are the priorities? and if you begin to do individual customers or individual segments of the population, then you really do elongate potentially the overall restoration. i think with respect to the mayor, we have been working very closely with her as well as the other local leaders in the counties and cities that we serve. and at the end of the day, all of us are working together to try and get the powe
in the mayor of baltimore, stephanie rawlings-blake. her city has extended a code red heat alert through tomorrow. good morning. >> good morning to you. >> tell me what you're doing for folks in the baltimore area to keep them from suffering heat exhaustion, heat stroke. it's supposed to be triple digits for the next couple of days. >> we're dealing with two weather emergencies, certainly the derecho, weird storm that no one knows what it is, but the heat is the majorening and that's where we anticipate being vulnerable with heat deaths. we've been giving out ice an asking city residents to check on vulnerable neighbors, those without power and they know don't have air conditioning. check on them, living in isolation, to check and really come together neighbor to neighbor. >> i read you spent your sunday, correct me if i'm wrong, handing out ice blocks to people who i know don't have the ac and in terms of major intersections, have lived in the d.c., baltimore area. i know morning commutes aren't fun, especially adding insult to injury with the fact that the lights aren't working. talk t
york, all these cities, new york, philadelphia, down toward washington and baltimore even, what we could see potentially throughout this afternoon, bow-shaped lines of thunderstorms and paths of wind damage. so, that is the potential. so, unfortunately, with the cooldown comes, we're going to see the frontal lifting mechanism that will fire off some severe storms, potentially, today. and also when we come back, we'll talk a little bit more also about the floods we're seeing in the west and we'll do that coming up with more on the heat and how long we'll see it and where the new heat wave comes, randi. >> all right. a lot to keep an eye on. >> yes. >> thank you. >>> overseas, too much rain is the problem in southern russia. flash flooding has killed now almost 100 people. you can see entire city streets were completely submerged. cars are stranded. floodwaters rose more than 20 feet while people were asleep. some people were rescued by police after seeking refuge on roofs and in trees. >>> relations between the u.s. and afghanistan have begun a new chapter. the u.s. has named afghan
is where the access to the biggest heat will be today. rapid city, minneapolis, green bay, even into chicago. temperatures once again between 90 12k3 100. tomorrow, that access heat moves into the northeast. philadelphia, washington, baltimore within more 1 00 degree days on tap for you. washington, washington has already had five times they've hit 100 degrees this year. today's high temperature, washington 95 today. staying in the 80s and low 90s. chicago, 96. kansas city, 97. but you can see where the swath of heat is. minneapolis, this is definitely going to go down the road books for the twin citys this summer. highs tomorrow, washington gets to 101 and you can see where the heat is. but then, this is a short lived affair. nothing like what we've been dealing with. cold front will move through, dry things out and cool things down for thursday and friday. a whole different picture than the heat of what we're seeing at the beginning of the week. in terms of the flood threat to the west, heavy rain is expected. strong storms, wind gusts, even lightning expected for the west tod
. the highs expected in the 100s and even higher today if you can believe it. cities like chicago and indianapolis and baltimore, yes, they've had hundreds before, but not like this. >> it is a trip that's going to tackle a lot of issues here globally. secretary of state hillary clinton arriving in paris this morning for the conference on syria. this is the first stop of a 13-day trip that touches on critical issues. they'll be discussing egypt, the middle east, the war in afghanistan and china and north korea. secretary clinton will also meet with palestinian president mahmoud abass and off to asia for a conference in afghanistan and tokyo, cambodia for meetings with officials from southeast nations. >> no summer vags vacation for her. now the florida kid has been offered his job back. here's the catch. lopez doesn't want it. he's a lifeguard and knew he was breaking the rules when you left his stand and ran into an area that was not -- officially his area but he saw a struggling swimmer. he saw a guy drowning and saw it and he had he had to respond. he told erin burnett he would
in the northeast, will be your extreme heat, d.c. 100 degrees for you. also today in new york city there is a heat advisory, tomorrow new york, to harrisburg, philadelphia, washington, baltimore, washington already had five 100-degree days this year and let's tack on another. not for today, today throughout the mid-atlantic, mid-90s and 93 in georgia and almost 100 in the twin cities. here's the access of the heat today. it shifts eastward once again. we've seen this before, we're at 101 in washington. the difference between this and the last heat wave, this is a two-day affair, today and tomorrow. then we'll see a cold front come through and cool the temperatures into much more comfortable territory. the big picture around the country. here's where the heat is through the plains and northeast. hot as well in the southwest. we've seen that with some storms up and down the mountains and the west. back to you. >> thank you, alexandra. >> we won't know for sure what killed sage stallone. the coroner conducted an autopsy on his oldest son. he was engaged to be married and working on various film proje
that surround the connect -- and connect the cities here. so now the after image two days later. you can see the size and the density of the lights where they shrink around baltimore and washington. pretty amazing when you consider what happened. >>> on to other news, just in to cn, the key gauge of the housing market hits a new low now, but for once it could actually be a good thing, especially if you're looking to buy or refinance. alison kosik at the new york stock exchange. alison, what is it? >> at a record low, 3.62%. it's a hit new low in the past 10, 11 weeks. i mentioned it's a good sign. it's actually a double-edged sword. mortgage rates obviously fall when the economy isn't doing well. the manufacturing sector is contracting. then you flip the coin over and it's actually a great time for people to buy a home when you see mortgage rates falling like this. but you have to remember, just because mortgage rates and home prices are low, don, it doesn't necessarily mean you can qualify for a loan. you know, banks are still very tight, very tight-fisted with giving out money, even to peo
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8